Monthly Archives: September 2011

22 Essential Tools for Testing Your Website’s Usability




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Google Chrome to Beat Out Mozilla Firefox by December

According to a recent report by the StatCounter web analytics firm, Google Chrome is on track to pass Mozilla Firefox’s number of users by December of this year. Unless Mozilla Firefox, which is the world’s second-most used browser in the world, can put an end to Chrome’s rapid growth rate, the Firefox browser era may [...]

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Premium Google Analytics with a Premium Price Tag

Yesterday afternoon, Enrique Munoz Torres, the Product Manager of the Google Analytics team, announced a new Premium version of Google Analytics. Initially, the product will only be available in the US, Canada, and the UK where Google indicated that it has already signed on Papa John’s, Travelocity, Gucci, and Transunion for the premium service. The [...]

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Crushing Barriers to Launching an SEO Firm — Part 2: Experience

The more experience you have, the easier it is to acquire clients. But that doesn’t mean that you need 10 years of C-level experience.

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Scrapers and the Panda Update – A Match Made in Heaven

I have an associate that runs a very large and heretofore successful content site. He’s an experienced and competent entrepreneur and CEO. For several years, everything came together, according to plan, as his website and traffic grew exponentially. He was adding staff and negotiating a move to new offices. The future seemed bright, sunglasses and [...]

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Infographic Link Building with StumbleUpon Paid Discovery

As a social marketing tool, StumbleUpon Paid Discovery (a.k.a. StumbleUpon ads) is underrated. Paid Discovery helps people who are likely to be interested in your infographic – or your clever article or how-to guide, etc. – find your infographic at a fraction of the cost of traditional promotional methods. When we promote an infographic we [...]

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$30 Million in Funding for Blekko: Blekko Has More Cash to Slash the Web

On Wednesday, search engine startup Blekko received $30 million in funding from various investors including Yandex, Russia’s top search engine. Trailing only behind Google, Bing, and Yahoo, Blekko is the fourth largest search engine in the US. With its motto “slash the web,” Blekko strives to provide search results that lack the spam and content [...]

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Google Analytics Real-Time

Today we’re very excited to bring real time data to Google Analytics with the launch of Google Analytics Real-Time: a set of new reports that show what’s happening on your site as it happens. Continue reading

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Google Analytics Real-Time

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Title Tags – Is 70 Characters the Best Practice? – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by Aaron Wheeler

It’s often pretty difficult to make a short title for a webpage that offers a lot of varied or super-specific information. At SEOmoz, we say that the best practice for title tag length is to keep titles under 70 characters. That’s pretty pithy considering that the title also includes your site or brand name, spaces, and other nondescript characters. So, does it matter if you go over 70 characters? How important is it to strictly adhere to this best practice? Cyrus Shepard does SEO for us here at SEOmoz, and he’ll answer that very question in this week’s Whiteboard Friday. Think title tags could or should be longer? Shorter? Let us know in the comments below!

 

Video Transcription

Howdy SEOmoz! Welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. My name is Cyrus. I do SEO here at SEOmoz. Today we’re talking about title tag length. How long is your title tag?

Bad title tag joke. For years, we’ve been telling people, the length of your title tag should be 70 characters or less. That this is best practices. But what does this really mean? Is it absolutely true? What happens if your title tags are longer than 70 characters? For example, the title of today’s post within the meta description is 77 characters. Not this title, but the actual HTML title tag, if you look at the source code, you’ll find that the title tag of today’s Whiteboard Friday is 77 characters. We’re actually over the 70 character title tag limit. Is that bad? Are we going to go to SEO hell for that? What does that mean?

Well, recently people have been doing some experiments to see just how many characters Google will index within a title tag. For years, we thought it was 70s. It’s fluctuated. But recent experiments have shown that Google will index anywhere between 150, one person even showed that they will index over 1,000 characters, and I will link to these experiments in the post. But does this mean that you should use all of those characters to your advantage? Can you use them to your advantage? Well, I got really curious about this. So I decided to perform some experiments here on the SEOmoz blog with super long title tags. We’re talking extreme title tags, like 200 characters long, 250 characters long, just blew them out of the water just to see what would happen.

Experiments

On the first experiment, I took 10 posts that did not get a lot of traffic, but they were pretty consistent traffic from week to week. I kept the old title tags and I just extended them with relevant keywords up to about 250 characters long. The results blew me away. In that first experiment, my traffic, over about a 12-week period, rose 136%. You can see, I’ll try to include a screen shot in the comments below of the Google Analytics. It exploded. I got really excited. So, I tried a second experiment. (Correction, the experiment took place over a 6 week period, not 12 like I stated in the video.)

Analytics

The second experiment I tried with existing successful pages, pages that were already getting a fairly high volume of traffic, that were getting a consistent level of traffic every week. On that experiment, over about the same 12-week period, traffic rose 8%. Cool, but overall site traffic rose 9%. So it was actually 1% below the site average.

For a third experiment, I tried again on a completely different site, a personal site. I changed a few pages, title tags. Traffic actually went down over a 12-week period 11%. On that site overall site traffic went down 15%.

So, in one of these experiments, the long title tag seemed to work really well. In the other two, it just seemed to be a wash. Why did this happen, but not here? I am going to get to that in a minute.

Title Tags less than 70 Characters

Now, what are the arguments for short title tags? The best practices that you always hear about, keep it less than 70 characters. There are reasons why this is best practices and why we recommend it time and time again.

The first reason is that Google will only display the first 70 characters, in general, in their SERPs. After that, they’re truncated. Users aren’t going to see them. So, if you are writing title tags longer than 70 characters, you’re basically writing it for the search engines, and time and time again we’ve found that if you’re doing something specifically for search engines and not for users, there is probably not a lot of search engine value in it. There might be some, but probably not much.

The second reason is our Correlated Ranking Factors, a survey that we perform every couple of years. Our highest on page correlation value for keyword specific usage was if it is found, if the keyword is found in the first word of the title tag, that was a 0.09 positive correlation. It is not a huge correlation, but it was our largest on page keyword factor. Year after year after year when we perform these correlation studies, we see a direct correlation between the position of the keyword in the title tag and how important it is in the query. So, the closer the keyword is to the beginning of the title tag, the more likely it is to be important in the query. You’re going to see this time and time again. It’s very consistent. Hundreds of webmasters know this from personal experience. You want your keywords at the beginning of the title tag to rank for those keywords. The further out you do it, at 220 characters, those keywords aren’t going to count for very much.

Title Tag Best Practices

Now the third reason is kind of new in today’s world, and that is the rise of social media. Twitter limits characters to 140 characters. So, if you have a 220 character title tag and you’re trying to share it on Twitter through automatic tweets or Facebook or whatever, they look spammy, they’re not shareable, people don’t want to share them. Shorter title tags, snappy, work really well.

For all these reasons, and for most of the time we found that longer title tags don’t help you, we say that less than 70 is best practices. Now, people get confused by when we say best practices what that means. Does it mean an absolute rule? No. It just means best practices works most of the time. It’s going to be your best bet. All other things being equal, it’s going to be what you want to implement, what you want to teach people to do, and generally how you want to practice.

So, what happened here? Why did this experiment rise 136%? Well, if you remember, these were low volume pages, pages that weren’t getting a lot of traffic anyway. The reason it rose, we suspect, is because those title tags were poorly optimized in the first place. They didn’t match the content. When we added a few keywords to the end, Google interpreted that as, hey, these match a little bit better to the content, and that’s why it rose. It was a fluke. If we would have wrote the title tags better in the first place, we could have seen this traffic all along.

So, with this in mind, I have some suggestions for your future title tag use, and best practices is going to continue to be less than 70 characters.

Best Practices are Guidelines, Not Rules

The first rule is always experiment. Like I said, if we would have tried something else, if we would have written different title tags in the first place, it could have helped us. What did it cost us to change those title tags? Zero. If your pages aren’t performing well, you can always try something different and you should try something different. I still see sites all the time, large eCommerce sites, that on thousands of pages they have their brand name, the first 20 characters of the title tag in places where they shouldn’t necessarily do that. SEOmoz did that for a number of years up until a few months ago. So, always experiment, not too much, but always try different things to see what title tags are going to work best for you.

Second is write for users. Here at SEOmoz our title tag is the same as the title of our post on our blog because we think it is important to meet users’ expectations. When they see a title tag in the SERP and they click through to your page, you want them to feel like they’ve arrived where they thought they were going to arrive. So, it doesn’t always have to match the title of your post, but something similar, something to make them comfortable, and something to talk to the users.

Third, remember to keep your important keywords first. Putting your important keywords out here isn’t going to help you much unless your titles are so poorly optimized in the first place that you really should rewrite them. So, put your important keywords, they don’t always have to be in the very first position, but as close to that first position as you can.

Lastly, what happens if your title tag is over 70 characters, such as the title tag of today’s Whiteboard Friday post at 77? Don’t sweat it. In our web app, in our Pro Web App, if you go over 77 characters, we issue a warning. It is not an error. It’s a warning. We just want you to know that maybe if your title tag is over that limit that it might not be the best written title tag. You might want to have a look at it, but here at SEOmoz we have thousands of title tags that go over the 70 keyword limit, and for the most part, we’re going to be fine. Best practices means that it’s best most of the time, but you can go outside of best practices if it’s warranted.

Remember, experiment, try different things out, find out what works best for you.

That’s it for today. Appreciate your comments below. Thanks everybody.

Video transcription by Speechpad.com

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